Winter’s End & Spring’s Beginnings


Some photos from recent hikes in the Eastern Ontario area …

Mud Lake – National Capital Region


Mud Lake is one of the most ecologically important natural habitats in the urban part of Canada’s Capital Region. It is identified as a Provincially Significant Wetland and an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest by the government of Ontario and is classified a Protected Area management Category IV (habitat and species management area).

This 60-hectare natural environment is a complex of wetlands along the Ottawa River, the majority of which is made up of deciduous swamp forest. The driest part, to the west, contains a mature forest stand which is made up predominantly of white, red and burr oak, as well as white pine.

Mud Lake is a habitat for a wide diversity of animal species. Located within the Lac Deschênes area and in a major migratory corridor, it specifically serves as an important environment for bird conservation and is recognized as one of the most popular urban sites for birdwatching in Canada. 269 species of birds have been recorded, as well as numerous species of amphibians, reptiles and fish that are not commonly found either regionally or nationally. It also hosts diverse plant life, with 44 rare and 15 uncommon plant species as well as several fauna species-at-risk.

Several species of invasive non-native plants threaten the biodiversity of the Mud Lake habitat. Eleven of these species have been recorded, covering about 29 percent of the total area of this natural habitat.

New Brunswick – Days 1 & 2


I arrived yesterday, August 8, at the St Martins Country Inn in the town of St Martins, New Brunswick. I will be here for the next week attending a photography course given by Freeman Patterson and André Gallant. I used yesterday afternoon and most of today exploring the area and taking photos. First stop, yesterday, was the beach just on the eastern edge of the town of St Martins. And by coincidence, I arrived there during the low tide. Given that St Martins is on Fundy Bay, there is a huge difference between low and high tide.

And today I explored the Fundy Trail by car and on foot. I parked at one of the parking lots near the entrance, and from there I hiked on one of the trails to Melvin Beach. I was keeping an eye on the clock so that I could arrive just before the end of the low tide. Yesterday at the St Martins beach I was amazed at how quickly the tide came in and I came a wee bit too close to experiencing the Atlantic Ocean around my ankles.

After the hike, I stopped in at the interpretive centre for something to drink, and while relaxing outside I was entertained by these cuties.

What Did I Do this Summer?


Do you remember returning to school every September and one of your first assignments was to write an essay on what you did during the summer? If only they had digital cameras back then – I could have shown my teacher what I did during the summer!

I typically carry my camera around with me and during this past summer I have captured some photos that I felt were worth keeping. These were photos taken while visiting friends, boating, riding my motorbike around the countryside, going kayaking, visiting nature areas, going for walks … in other words, many of the things I did this summer. I hope you enjoy viewing them as much as I enjoyed visiting these places and taking the photos.