Visit to a Country Garden


Some friends and I had an opportunity to visit eastern Ontario mutual friends this past weekend. As usual, my camera was slung over my shoulder, and I spent some time wandering around the property and gardens taking snaps of anything that caught my interest. The photos in this album are the ones I decided to keep.

Silicon Beauty


This week’s photos are brought to you by the letter “G” for “glass”.
(Weekly Photo – Week #07, February 12, 2014)

Saying that a glass is half‑full or half‑empty is another way of stating the positive or negative, or the difference between optimism and pessimism. A cynical person might refer to these sayings as irresponsible hopefulness or practical reasonableness. As for me, I search for the person who sees an empty glass lying in the dry sand of a desert, and states, “That glass has a lot of potential to hold water.”

Last week’s photos focused (no pun intended) on Fresnel lenses, yet another use of glass. In this week’s photos I present a few photos of glass items that I have had an opportunity to photograph. For as long as I remember, I have been fascinated with glass and glass objects. As a young child, and without my parents’ knowledge, I would melt glass tubes with the heat of our gas stove and then stretch and bend the glass – just to see what I could do with this fascinating material. I went a step further and took a three‑day course on glass blowing (to discover that this was certainly not my forte, but fun all the same).

In the past, I have had a large collection of glass bottles and other glass objects, and eventually gave up much of these as collectors of dust – yet I still have a few pieces, which I cherish.

Several years ago, I started taking photographs of glass objects only to discover that these are among the most difficult objects to photograph! The properties of glass objects that make them so wonderful to look at, are also the properties that are the most difficult to photograph. If the scene is not set up properly, the glass objects reflect everything, including the lights, camera and photographer. Unless the lighting is correct, the glass objects look flat in the final images.

One of my goals is to master the art of taking photographs of glass objects. Another goal, not related to photography, is to visit the world’s largest glass museum in Corning, New York. That should make for a great motor biking trip next summer.