Vimy Monument Statues


The Canadian War Museum has custody of 17 of the 20 plaster figures that were created by the sculptor Walter Seymour Allward for his creation of the Vimy Memorial located at Vimy Ridge in France. These plaster figures were created between 1925 and 1930. Professional stone carvers worked from the design of these plaster casts to create the final statues on the Vimy Memorial.

In 1937 the plaster figures were packed in crates and shipped to Canada, where they were stored by the Department of Public Works as part of the Canadian War Museum artifact collection. The Department of Veteran Affairs had custody of the plaster figures, and on May 3, 1960 informed the museum that “…the Minister of Veterans Affairs had agreed that the models may be destroyed” so long as photographs were taken of them first.

That did not happen, and the 17 plaster figures can be viewed by the public at the Canadian War Museum. The remaining 3 plaster figures are on display in the Military Communications and Electronics Museum at the Canadian Forces Base in Kingston.

I fell in love with these powerful works of art, and during the past three years I have paid numerous visits to the museum to take photos under various lighting conditions. This video is the result of my time and effort.

Butterfly Exhibit – Canadian Museum of Nature


Some recent photos taken at the live butterfly collection at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, Ontario.

 

Photo Scavenger Hunt – Fall 2017


On Saturday, September 30, 2017, I attended a photo scavenger hunt in the Ottawa downtown area. There was no prize for your efforts and I used the time just to explore parts of the Ottawa area around the National Gallery of Canada. These are some of the photos that I took during my 3 or 4 hours of exploration.

Mud Lake – National Capital Region


This morning I met up at 7:00 am with some of the members of the Camera Club of Ottawa so that we could explore the Mud Lake area in the morning light and when there are fewer people around. The wild life was a wee bit scarce and apart from the constant territorial disagreements between the Canadian geese, there wasn’t a lot of action. I did manage to get a few photos that I thought were worth keeping.

After a while, I decided to break away from the group and head out on my own to explore the swampy areas of Mud Lake. I’m glad I did – although not a great photo, I managed to capture three woodland ducks (one female and two males) having a ménage à trois in the bushes.

Ménage à Trois

I resisted telling them to get a room. Not often you have a chance to see the wildlife in action.

Mud Lake – National Capital Region


Mud Lake is one of the most ecologically important natural habitats in the urban part of Canada’s Capital Region. It is identified as a Provincially Significant Wetland and an Area of Natural and Scientific Interest by the government of Ontario and is classified a Protected Area management Category IV (habitat and species management area).

This 60-hectare natural environment is a complex of wetlands along the Ottawa River, the majority of which is made up of deciduous swamp forest. The driest part, to the west, contains a mature forest stand which is made up predominantly of white, red and burr oak, as well as white pine.

Mud Lake is a habitat for a wide diversity of animal species. Located within the Lac Deschênes area and in a major migratory corridor, it specifically serves as an important environment for bird conservation and is recognized as one of the most popular urban sites for birdwatching in Canada. 269 species of birds have been recorded, as well as numerous species of amphibians, reptiles and fish that are not commonly found either regionally or nationally. It also hosts diverse plant life, with 44 rare and 15 uncommon plant species as well as several fauna species-at-risk.

Several species of invasive non-native plants threaten the biodiversity of the Mud Lake habitat. Eleven of these species have been recorded, covering about 29 percent of the total area of this natural habitat.

Odds & Sods … again …


As soon as spring comes, I want to be out and about, with and without my camera. When I have my camera with me I tend to take a lot of photos. But during spring, summer and fall, since I want to be out, I don’t spend a lot of time processing the photos I take. Every once in a while, I do find some quiet time and I catch up and publish the photos that I like.

So, enjoy …

Casino du Lac-Leamy’s Sound of Light – China (August 6, 2016)


China’s contribution to the 2016 Casino du Lac-Lemy’s Fireworks Competition